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TEXTURES
TEXTURE ART
TEXTURE COLLAGE
Set out some collage materials for your children; such as, textured paper scraps, scraps of materials, nature objects, small metal objects, cotton balls and old puzzle pieces.
Give your children some plain sheets of heavy paper and some glue.
Encourage them to create interesting collages using different textures.
 
TEXTURE PAINT
You can add texture to the paint your children use.
Try adding sand for a gritty texture.
Try adding large glitter for a metallic texture.
 
TEXTURE RUBBINGS
Give your children some copy paper and a crayon that has been peeled.
Set out some objects such as; basket trays, graters, ribbed trays, etc.
Have your children lay their papers on top and press the side of their crayon across their papers.
Alternative: Take your children outside if the weather permits and have them notice the different textures on the bark of trees. Have them make tree rubbings, or utility lid rubbings.
TEXTURE GAMES
TEXTURE MATCH-UPS
Cut 3” x 3” squares of fabric.
Cut out three different colors of corduroy; velveteen, fake fur, wool, leather, etc.
Mix up the squares.
Have your children take turns sorting the fabrics by texture.
Variation: To turn the game into a seasonal game, cut the material into a seasonal shape.
 
TEXTURE HUNT
This is a good game with one or two children.
Go on a walk around your house or classroom and have your children touch various objects.
Ask each child to describe the texture.
Can they find two objects that feel the same.
How many different kinds of textures can they find?
 
GUESS THE OBJECT (BY TEXTURE)
This is also a good game with one or two children.
Have a child close her eyes and try to tell what an object is by touching it to her arm.
Take turns using different objects, such as; feathers, cotton balls, pencil, spoon, crayon, etc.
 
SIMPLE TEXTURE SORTS
Let your children take turns playing this game.
Place 5 objects in a basket that have a rough finish.
Place 5 objects in the basket that have a smooth finish.
Set the basket on a table.
Mix up the objects and have the child make two piles of objects on the table, one rough and one smooth.
Variation: You can also play this game using soft and hard
 TEXTURE LANGUAGE ACTIVITIES
TEXTURE LETTERS
When teaching your children to recognize letters, try using the sense of touch. Create textured letters for your child to feel and trace his fingers on. You will need a set of medium sized alphabet letters to use for patterns.
Lay one of the letter shapes on a piece of sandpaper and trace around it.
Then cut out the sand paper letter.
Continue with other letters you want your child to learn.
Show your child how to trace their finger over the shape of the letter.
Guide his finger with the same motion that you would use to write the letter.
Repeat the name of the letter as the child is experiencing the touch of the letter.
 
TEXTURE NAMES
Whenever your child touches or holds a different textured surface, explain what we call the texture.
Examples: smooth, soft, bumpy, scratchy, rough, hard, soggy, etc.
Your child may not use these words right away, but by your use of the words, she will eventually understand the difference in the textures of objects.
TEXTURE SCIENCE
NATURE OBJECTS
Objects found in nature offer an abundance of textures for your child to discover.
Animal coats – furry, smooth, leathery, bumpy, soft, etc.
Tree trunks – bumpy, smooth, rough, flaky, etc.
Leaves – slick, smooth, prickly, etc.
Rocks – smooth, jagged, rough, etc.
Dirt – smooth, bumpy, soggy, etc.
Shells – smooth, ribbed, bumpy, etc.
 
CATEGORIZING
Set out a number of objects for your child to examine.
Have them determine which texture category each object fits into.
Categories: Soft, smooth, hard, rough.
 
TEXTURE WALK
You will need a large outdoor area for this activity.
Set up a walkway of textures.
Use carpet squares of different textures, or make your own squares, using cotton balls, sandpaper, sponges, gravel and packing material.
Let your children take turns walking barefoot over the textures.
Encourage your children to say how each square feels under their feet.
TEXTURE SNACKS
TEXTURE SNACKS
Whenever you have a snack with a different texture, point it out to your children and discuss how the food feels in their mouths.
Rice Pudding
Chunky fruit Jello
Frosting vs. cookies
Soup vs. crackers – What happens if you put the crackers in the soup?